Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Med School Admissions Veteran Shares Her Experience How to Get In

document.createElement('audio'); https://media.blubrry.com/admissions_straight_talk/p/www.accepted.com/hubfs/Podcast_audio_files/Podcast/IV_Cyd_Foote_2019.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | TuneIn | Spotify Accepted admissions consultant Cydney Foote sheds light on the medical school application process [Show Summary] Are you not quite ready to submit your AMCAS application? Don’t panic. We’ve got the advice you need to polish off your personal statement, MMEs, and activity descriptions. Listen to the podcast for answers to â€Å"How many schools should you apply to?† â€Å"How should you choose where to apply?† â€Å"What’s the difference between the personal statement, the most meaningful experiences, and the activity descriptions.† Plus we’ll give you some tips on how to manage a deluge of secondaries and even your residency personal statement. Cydney Foote shares her tips for applying successfully to medical school [Show Notes] Our guest today, Cydney Foote, has been a medical school admissions consultant since she started at Accepted in 2001. Needless to say, she’s helped hundreds of happy clients get accepted to allopathic and osteopathic medical schools as well as residency programs. During this podcast she’ll address some of the most common questions we get and also some of the most common myths out there about med school admissions. When this show airs it will be June 4. The first day to submit the AMCAS this year was May 31. If applicants haven’t submitted already, are they â€Å"late?† Have they missed the boat and is their application already doomed to the reject pile? [2:30] That is a really good question, and people panic about this every year. To be honest it is one of the biggest myths out there that you need to get your application in on the first day. From recent years I know that even those who submitted on June 7th had their information sent the same time as those who submitted the first day. A week or two later than the first submission date is not late, but if you are getting into July and August that is not the ideal time to apply. I’ll also say, though, that it is really important for you to apply when you are ready. If you are a week away from getting what you need, it is far better to submit a week or two into June than start rushing. How do you advise applicants to select the schools they are applying to? [3:55] I look at the stats first – what’s the lowest accepted value of MCAT and cumulative GPA. If it is in the range, then I look at acceptance rates. Are they looking to apply someplace that only accepts a very small percentage of out-of-state applicants, or do they have an overall low acceptance rate? If so, those may not be the top picks. You want to choose a mix of schools where you are competitive, but also a few reach schools. I think a lot of people overweight their reach schools – while they might reach the lowest accepted value, they are not near the mean. Once the quant factors are set, then it is digging into the schools themselves – looking at position statements, or specialties you are interested in. You have to make the connection with what the applicant wants. In-state vs. out-of-state matters, too. Linda: Accepted has the Med School Selectivity Index of almost all allopathic and osteopathic schools, and also tools that show acceptance rates in-state and out-of-state. How many schools do you recommend they apply to or does that vary by client? [7:30] It really varies. Some people just apply to a handful for whatever reason – the fewer you apply to, the more you need the higher stats and connections. I have some who only apply to 3-4 schools because they had done research at the particular schools or have other connections. I think most people who have more average stats apply to 20-25 schools and some to as many as 30 schools. Some apply to a lot of allopathic and osteopathic schools. Keep in mind that you will have secondaries for a lot of those schools and you don’t want to overburden yourself. You can actually stagger your secondaries so they don’t come all at the same time, which is often a good strategy you only need to select one school for your AMCAS application to be verified. If you apply to the most competitive schools first, you’ll have a much more balanced season. I don’t recommend delaying a Harvard or Stanford, but for state schools you could do that a bit later. Let’s talk a bit about the primary application, specifically the AMCAS. What should go into the personal statement vs. the most meaningful experiences vs. the activity description? [10:41] I like to think of the personal statement as the first introduction, getting to know you as a person. It should focus around a theme service, resilience, or more broad ideas of this person, and whether or not they are mature and committed to medicine. In other words a much broader statement. For the MME you want to show impact on you or impact on others, not just as an important thing to have done. It needs to have been meaningful to you and your personal development. Maybe you mentioned it in your personal statement but you really flesh it out in the MME in terms of why it was so significant. Descriptions are much more basic, with only 700 characters to work with, but you need to share why they are important to you. You don’t want anything there just because you did it. Make the connection of why it was good for you. Can you give a little more guidance on the most meaningful experiences – applicants can really struggle with that. [12:33] Don’t repeat anything in the personal statement and the MME. Using the same language is not acceptable, but you can certainly talk about them in both for sure. You obviously dig deeper in the MME. In the personal statement you show how you are developing as a doctor, for instance, whereas with the MME how you are developing as a contributor to your community. I think if an experience is meaningful enough to be in the personal statement and the MME, it should be layered enough that you can pick different things to write about. You can also talk about your effect on specific people. There are different approaches that you take to both, but under no circumstances should the language be the same. What about gap years? [13:54] I think they are great if you need or want to take them, however some people aren’t in the position to do so when they apply. I think it depends on what you are doing it for. If it increases your profile that is great. The problem is that some people will lose contact with people they need to support them in med school – losing contact with professors, for example. However, working abroad or as a scribe can be really effective in enhancing your candidacy. Bottom line, don’t feel compelled to take the gap year, but also take advantage of it if you can. If applicants use their best material for the primary essays, how can they have impressive material for the secondaries? [16:08] You need to keep working. Once your primary is in, your preparation does not stop – keep volunteering, keep shadowing. One of my most impressive clients was looking for new shadowing opportunities throughout the whole year. Even after completing secondaries she was sending updates to schools on what she had been doing and the nitty gritty about what she had learned and how it had affected her perception of medicine. Creating new material along the way is one of the best things to do, and then taking time to reflect on what you have done and why it is meaningful is very important in this process. It is critical to have authentic experiences. Tell what you’ve done, and be sure to reflect on why it was important to you. How do you recommend applicants prepare for secondaries, which tend to come in a deluge? [21:07] Pre-writing secondaries is a wonderful idea. By the time this comes out you will have about a month before secondaries start rolling in. I love spreadsheets, and it is helpful to look at the schools you want to apply to, and which schools have questions that are related. You will have a lot of specific school questions, but you can recycle your greatest challenge questions, questions about travel, or upcoming activities for the year. There are certainly things you can use over and over. So my suggestion is start with the longest essay, as it is much easier to cut material down. Then start trimming down from there with other schools. A lot are directly asking what school you want to go to, so weave that into all aspects of secondaries. If there is a big emphasis on underserved or rural communities, that can be woven into all aspects of your secondaries, which shows the connections. Do you have advice for non-traditional applicants who are perhaps 4,5 or more years out of college? [23:29] They have a lot to bring to the table, and my biggest advice would be don’t try and justify why you have â€Å"always wanted to be a doctor† but took another path. That doesn’t ring true if you really wanted to you would have done it immediately. What you need to articulate is what has brought you to medicine NOW. Own your experience. People will often want to dismiss what they have done if not medically-related. Regardless of your profession to this point, you have certain skills that are applicable to medicine. I worked with a lawyer years ago and she didn’t want to talk about her law degree. I told her it was critically important to mention to show how you think and react to things and how it will affect your career in medicine, and ultimately she was really successful. Bottom line, boost yourself up, and own your experience. You can absolutely show transferable skills as they relate to medicine. Cyd for the last several years, you’ve presented an outstanding webinar on med school interviews and we’ll link to it from the show notes. I’m not going to ask you to repeat the presentation here and now, but if you had one piece of advice that you could share related to med school interviews, what would it be? [26:04] Practice. Get comfortable with your stories, as that is the thing that can make the biggest difference. You don’t want to have a script, but you want to be able to talk about your stories in a way that is familiar so that when you are nervous and your mind goes out the window you still have things to talk about. I suggest to clients they talk to themselves while doing mundane things like the dishes, to help you show you know what you are talking about when the time comes. You also have worked with a wide variety of residency applicants over the years on their personal statement and residency applications. While ERAS is not yet open, how will a residency personal statement differ from a med school personal statement? [27:14] The biggest difference is you are not showing why you want to be a doctor, but why that specialty is the right one for you. It’s important to show interest in the field and how you got there, the technical skills you have related to that specialty, and the qualities you possess that are needed to be a surgeon vs. a PCP, and why that particular specialty fits you. Any tips for residency applicants? [27:55] Take notes as you go through rotations. When it comes time to write experiences in your personal statement you will draw a blank, but if you have a notebook about things you’ve done you’ll have a lot of material to work with. What would you have liked me to ask you? [28:21] One thing we didn’t talk about is how you know when you are ready to apply. I think far too many people just rush into it. They are on a schedule. If you feel like your application will benefit from taking the MCAT again or taking a year to do more clinical work or research, take it. You are a stronger candidate if you apply when you are ready. Related Links: †¢ Get in Touch With Cyd Foote! †¢ How to Nail Your Medical School Interviews, an on-demand webinar recording †¢ Get Accepted to Med School with Low Stats, a live webinar scheduled for June 11th †¢ Activity Descriptions for Med School: 4 Questions That Will Make Yours Awesome †¢ Accepteds Medical Admissions Consulting Related Shows: †¢ Doctor, Mother, SMILE Score Creator †¢ Writing for Medical School: Personal Statements, Activities, and Secondaries †¢ Kaiser Medical School: State-of-the-Art, Patient-Focused, and Free †¢ Apply at Your Best: Advice from a Med School Admissions Expert Subscribe: Podcast Feed ; Med School Admissions Veteran Shares Her Experience How to Get In document.createElement('audio'); https://media.blubrry.com/admissions_straight_talk/p/www.accepted.com/hubfs/Podcast_audio_files/Podcast/IV_Cyd_Foote_2019.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | TuneIn | Spotify Accepted admissions consultant Cydney Foote sheds light on the medical school application process [Show Summary] Are you not quite ready to submit your AMCAS application? Don’t panic. We’ve got the advice you need to polish off your personal statement, MMEs, and activity descriptions. Listen to the podcast for answers to â€Å"How many schools should you apply to?† â€Å"How should you choose where to apply?† â€Å"What’s the difference between the personal statement, the most meaningful experiences, and the activity descriptions.† Plus we’ll give you some tips on how to manage a deluge of secondaries and even your residency personal statement. Cydney Foote shares her tips for applying successfully to medical school [Show Notes] Our guest today, Cydney Foote, has been a medical school admissions consultant since she started at Accepted in 2001. Needless to say, she’s helped hundreds of happy clients get accepted to allopathic and osteopathic medical schools as well as residency programs. During this podcast she’ll address some of the most common questions we get and also some of the most common myths out there about med school admissions. When this show airs it will be June 4. The first day to submit the AMCAS this year was May 31. If applicants haven’t submitted already, are they â€Å"late?† Have they missed the boat and is their application already doomed to the reject pile? [2:30] That is a really good question, and people panic about this every year. To be honest it is one of the biggest myths out there that you need to get your application in on the first day. From recent years I know that even those who submitted on June 7th had their information sent the same time as those who submitted the first day. A week or two later than the first submission date is not late, but if you are getting into July and August that is not the ideal time to apply. I’ll also say, though, that it is really important for you to apply when you are ready. If you are a week away from getting what you need, it is far better to submit a week or two into June than start rushing. How do you advise applicants to select the schools they are applying to? [3:55] I look at the stats first – what’s the lowest accepted value of MCAT and cumulative GPA. If it is in the range, then I look at acceptance rates. Are they looking to apply someplace that only accepts a very small percentage of out-of-state applicants, or do they have an overall low acceptance rate? If so, those may not be the top picks. You want to choose a mix of schools where you are competitive, but also a few reach schools. I think a lot of people overweight their reach schools – while they might reach the lowest accepted value, they are not near the mean. Once the quant factors are set, then it is digging into the schools themselves – looking at position statements, or specialties you are interested in. You have to make the connection with what the applicant wants. In-state vs. out-of-state matters, too. Linda: Accepted has the Med School Selectivity Index of almost all allopathic and osteopathic schools, and also tools that show acceptance rates in-state and out-of-state. How many schools do you recommend they apply to or does that vary by client? [7:30] It really varies. Some people just apply to a handful for whatever reason – the fewer you apply to, the more you need the higher stats and connections. I have some who only apply to 3-4 schools because they had done research at the particular schools or have other connections. I think most people who have more average stats apply to 20-25 schools and some to as many as 30 schools. Some apply to a lot of allopathic and osteopathic schools. Keep in mind that you will have secondaries for a lot of those schools and you don’t want to overburden yourself. You can actually stagger your secondaries so they don’t come all at the same time, which is often a good strategy you only need to select one school for your AMCAS application to be verified. If you apply to the most competitive schools first, you’ll have a much more balanced season. I don’t recommend delaying a Harvard or Stanford, but for state schools you could do that a bit later. Let’s talk a bit about the primary application, specifically the AMCAS. What should go into the personal statement vs. the most meaningful experiences vs. the activity description? [10:41] I like to think of the personal statement as the first introduction, getting to know you as a person. It should focus around a theme service, resilience, or more broad ideas of this person, and whether or not they are mature and committed to medicine. In other words a much broader statement. For the MME you want to show impact on you or impact on others, not just as an important thing to have done. It needs to have been meaningful to you and your personal development. Maybe you mentioned it in your personal statement but you really flesh it out in the MME in terms of why it was so significant. Descriptions are much more basic, with only 700 characters to work with, but you need to share why they are important to you. You don’t want anything there just because you did it. Make the connection of why it was good for you. Can you give a little more guidance on the most meaningful experiences – applicants can really struggle with that. [12:33] Don’t repeat anything in the personal statement and the MME. Using the same language is not acceptable, but you can certainly talk about them in both for sure. You obviously dig deeper in the MME. In the personal statement you show how you are developing as a doctor, for instance, whereas with the MME how you are developing as a contributor to your community. I think if an experience is meaningful enough to be in the personal statement and the MME, it should be layered enough that you can pick different things to write about. You can also talk about your effect on specific people. There are different approaches that you take to both, but under no circumstances should the language be the same. What about gap years? [13:54] I think they are great if you need or want to take them, however some people aren’t in the position to do so when they apply. I think it depends on what you are doing it for. If it increases your profile that is great. The problem is that some people will lose contact with people they need to support them in med school – losing contact with professors, for example. However, working abroad or as a scribe can be really effective in enhancing your candidacy. Bottom line, don’t feel compelled to take the gap year, but also take advantage of it if you can. If applicants use their best material for the primary essays, how can they have impressive material for the secondaries? [16:08] You need to keep working. Once your primary is in, your preparation does not stop – keep volunteering, keep shadowing. One of my most impressive clients was looking for new shadowing opportunities throughout the whole year. Even after completing secondaries she was sending updates to schools on what she had been doing and the nitty gritty about what she had learned and how it had affected her perception of medicine. Creating new material along the way is one of the best things to do, and then taking time to reflect on what you have done and why it is meaningful is very important in this process. It is critical to have authentic experiences. Tell what you’ve done, and be sure to reflect on why it was important to you. How do you recommend applicants prepare for secondaries, which tend to come in a deluge? [21:07] Pre-writing secondaries is a wonderful idea. By the time this comes out you will have about a month before secondaries start rolling in. I love spreadsheets, and it is helpful to look at the schools you want to apply to, and which schools have questions that are related. You will have a lot of specific school questions, but you can recycle your greatest challenge questions, questions about travel, or upcoming activities for the year. There are certainly things you can use over and over. So my suggestion is start with the longest essay, as it is much easier to cut material down. Then start trimming down from there with other schools. A lot are directly asking what school you want to go to, so weave that into all aspects of secondaries. If there is a big emphasis on underserved or rural communities, that can be woven into all aspects of your secondaries, which shows the connections. Do you have advice for non-traditional applicants who are perhaps 4,5 or more years out of college? [23:29] They have a lot to bring to the table, and my biggest advice would be don’t try and justify why you have â€Å"always wanted to be a doctor† but took another path. That doesn’t ring true if you really wanted to you would have done it immediately. What you need to articulate is what has brought you to medicine NOW. Own your experience. People will often want to dismiss what they have done if not medically-related. Regardless of your profession to this point, you have certain skills that are applicable to medicine. I worked with a lawyer years ago and she didn’t want to talk about her law degree. I told her it was critically important to mention to show how you think and react to things and how it will affect your career in medicine, and ultimately she was really successful. Bottom line, boost yourself up, and own your experience. You can absolutely show transferable skills as they relate to medicine. Cyd for the last several years, you’ve presented an outstanding webinar on med school interviews and we’ll link to it from the show notes. I’m not going to ask you to repeat the presentation here and now, but if you had one piece of advice that you could share related to med school interviews, what would it be? [26:04] Practice. Get comfortable with your stories, as that is the thing that can make the biggest difference. You don’t want to have a script, but you want to be able to talk about your stories in a way that is familiar so that when you are nervous and your mind goes out the window you still have things to talk about. I suggest to clients they talk to themselves while doing mundane things like the dishes, to help you show you know what you are talking about when the time comes. You also have worked with a wide variety of residency applicants over the years on their personal statement and residency applications. While ERAS is not yet open, how will a residency personal statement differ from a med school personal statement? [27:14] The biggest difference is you are not showing why you want to be a doctor, but why that specialty is the right one for you. It’s important to show interest in the field and how you got there, the technical skills you have related to that specialty, and the qualities you possess that are needed to be a surgeon vs. a PCP, and why that particular specialty fits you. Any tips for residency applicants? [27:55] Take notes as you go through rotations. When it comes time to write experiences in your personal statement you will draw a blank, but if you have a notebook about things you’ve done you’ll have a lot of material to work with. What would you have liked me to ask you? [28:21] One thing we didn’t talk about is how you know when you are ready to apply. I think far too many people just rush into it. They are on a schedule. If you feel like your application will benefit from taking the MCAT again or taking a year to do more clinical work or research, take it. You are a stronger candidate if you apply when you are ready. Related Links: †¢ Get in Touch With Cyd Foote! †¢ How to Nail Your Medical School Interviews, an on-demand webinar recording †¢ Get Accepted to Med School with Low Stats, a live webinar scheduled for June 11th †¢ Activity Descriptions for Med School: 4 Questions That Will Make Yours Awesome †¢ Accepteds Medical Admissions Consulting Related Shows: †¢ Doctor, Mother, SMILE Score Creator †¢ Writing for Medical School: Personal Statements, Activities, and Secondaries †¢ Kaiser Medical School: State-of-the-Art, Patient-Focused, and Free †¢ Apply at Your Best: Advice from a Med School Admissions Expert Subscribe: Podcast Feed ;

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Human Perception Of The World - 890 Words

The world is a representation that our bodies and our minds construct within ourselves to represent the outside world. In other words, human perception of the world is subjective to the individual. We pick and choose the experiences that we want to remember and how we want to remember them while we unconsciously forget the majority of our life experiences. We see and acknowledge what we want to see and ignore what we think is not related to us. The way we see, understand and interpret the outside world is structured by what we know and what we believe which also goes back to our cultures and our environment, which is an individual’s history. For us, to be aware of our surrounding and the moment in history that we are living we have memory. Memory is an illustration of the past, it’s our subjective and objective perception of the past. Both, our conscious and unconscious memory plays a vital role on an individual identity. Memory and history will always be intertwined, m emory and history are not set in stones and are always changing due to the fact that we as human beings are always changing and moving through time and space. Memory and forgetting also goes in hand in hand. Most of our memories are unconscious, we do not remember everything that happens in our lives, we forget the rest. Human memories reflect the society and the the historical time period they live in. Millions of people are unware of their history, many tries to find and lean about their history whileShow MoreRelatedHuman Perception Of The World1406 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction Our perception of the world as individuals is unusually thought of because we are unaware of the physiological and psychological capabilities our brains possess. Through sound, recognition, and vision, animals have inherited these traits for generations. One significant factor pertaining to who we are and how we perceive the world around us are influenced by the genes inherited in our lineage. One particular trait that is important in our lives is color vision and color blindness, particularlyRead MoreThe Work of James Jerome Gibson1073 Words   |  5 PagesJames Jerome Gibson was born on January 27, 1904, in McConnelsville, Ohio, U.S. and died on December 11, 1979. He was an experimental psychologist whose work focused primarily on visual perception. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Princeton University in 1928 and joined the faculty of Smith College. During World War II he served in the Army Air Forces (1942–46). In the Army, Gibson developed tests used to screen potential pilots. In doing so, he made the observation that pilots orient themselvesRead MoreDescartes And Berkeley s Beliefs On The Source Of Human Knowledge1155 Words   |  5 PagesBerkeley’s beliefs on the source of human knowledge and how it relates to their definitions of absolute truth. According to Descartes, the source of human knowledge is found only through thinking, because our senses deceive us. Absolute truth, for Descartes, is objective fact established through deductive reasoning. Berkeley, on the other hand, believes that human knowledge originates from perception and that absolute fact is one’s perceptions of the material world. In this paper I will explore Descartes’Read MoreCompare and contrast the significance for psychology of Descartes and Kant1568 Words   |  7 Pagesgreat influence on the development of psychology. I am going to compare their significance of psychology. By observing some mechanical things, Descartes had an idea that human and animal work like automata. (Klein, 1970) This idea became a basic concept of Descartes’ theories of the brain and visual perception. He thought that the human mind and body were separate from each other. (Klein, 1970) The body is completely independent of the mind, but the body can interact with the mind to produce differentRead MoreChanneling Communication Between the World and Us Through Sense Perception874 Words   |  4 PagesBy definition, sense perception is whereby the idea of sense is referred to the external stimulus in which we perceive our knowledge through while perception is defined to be the awareness towards something through our senses. Long before we learned how to use language, reasoning, faith, or emotions, we have already been making use of our external stimuluses’ to make sense or even be conscious of the world. This makes sense perception our primary source of obtaining kn owledge since it is the onlyRead MorePerception Plays A Huge Role In Someone’S Life. â€Å"When A1297 Words   |  6 PagesPerception plays a huge role in someone’s life. â€Å"When a distinction is made between sensation and perception, sensation is frequently identified as involving simple â€Å"elementary† processes that occur right at the beginning of a sensory system, as when light stimulates receptors in the eye. In contrast, perception is identified with complicated processes that involves higher-order mechanisms such as understanding and memory that involve activity in the brain† (Goldstein, 1980, p. 7). It is simply theRead MoreLanguage and human identity1466 Words   |  6 Pagesonly by a stronger ability in language could change peoples perspective. It is not just how people communicate it is the way for mankind to see the world in different perspective of different perceptions that are influenced by emotions and cultures. According to BBC. co.uk â€Å"It’s estimated that up to 7,000 different languages are spoken around the world. 90% of these languages are used by less than 100,000 people. Over a million people converse in 150-200 languages and 46 languages have just a singleRead MoreBelonging- Connections to Place1700 Words   |  7 PagesBelonging Essay 2011 HSC Question Question 3 (15 marks) Explore how perceptions of belonging and not belonging can be inï ¬â€šuenced by connections to places. In your response, refer to your prescribed text and at least ONE other related text of your own choosing. The prescribed texts are listed on the next page. Word Length: 1200 words A sense of belonging is an essential part of the human condition; it is a desire shared by all. Belonging refers to the ability of an individual to ï ¬ t in a speciï ¬ ed placeRead MoreAnalysis Of The Poem Mont Blanc 912 Words   |  4 Pageshow imperative the human mind is in regard to nature. The first few lines establish a relation that is essential to all life. With these lines alone, Shelley is pulling from many of the inclinations made by William Wordsworth in his poem, â€Å"Tintern Abbey†. There is however an expansion made on Wordsworth’s affections toward nature and its aweing power; while Shelley agrees that there is only a small amount of those who can truly grasp the full intention of what the natural world teaches, he largelyRead MoreAs Sense Perception Is A Vital Way Of Knowing, To Question1465 Words   |  6 PagesAs sense perception is a vital way of knowing, to question its reliability is to question existing knowledge itself. It embodies our sense, touch and taste, to name a few and within the realm of the human sciences is significant. It is what provides evidence and allows for justification, through the form of qualitative data. However, when this evidence has the chance of being faltered, perhaps all qualitative data is then altered. This is what allows us to question, to what extent is sense perception

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An...

A slave narrative is a work of literature that tells the first hand account of slaves. Slave narratives are in a sense they autobiography for slave culture. Slaves in these stories usually go through great turmoil and stress, overcome many obstacles, and contribute many a tale of the perseverance of their culture, family and religion. All these characteristics are found in the story of Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings, as well as the narrative of Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave. Both of these real life accounts have these tropes, but in comparison do not exclusively only both contain these points. The narratives of both these men have a great deal in common even though Equiano’s death and Douglass’ birth were separated by twenty-one years, though Douglass’ birthdate is debateable; for even he does not know his own date of birth. Both Equiano and Douglass use a great deal of religious moments throughout their stories, Equiano having a great deal more points on the subject as his story was written longer and was infused much more with religious stories and voice. These writers also both put an emphasis on the acquiring of literacy even during their time as slaves, though there most common comparison has to be their stories containing their childhood moments. These men did a great deal to get their stories out to the world and had to show utmost poise in order to be taken seriously by a largelyShow MoreRelatedThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1093 Words   |  5 Pagespossible difference.† -Frederick Douglass. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass, shares the story of the struggles of an American slave during the eighteenth-century. Fredrick Douglass was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1818. While being raised by his grandmother, Betsey Bailey, he snuck around at night to meet his mother nearby, assuming that his slaveholder, Captain Anthony, was his father. From adolescence, Douglass knew he was differentRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1251 Words   |  6 PagesJustine Boonstra Frey- Period 1 MAJOR WORKS REVIEW AP Lang Version GENERAL 1. Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. 1845. New York: Fine, 2003. Print. 2. Autobiography STRUCTURE 1. Point of View: First Person, the narrator Frederick Douglass 2. Relationship of POV to meaning: 3. Plot Structure a. Exposition: Douglass describes that his mother was a black slave, and his father was a white man. Thus, he was born into slavery and was sent off toRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Essay2361 Words   |  10 PagesReference Teacher Resources ââ€" » More ââ€" » Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Summary Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave cover image summary In Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Douglass recounts his experiences as a slave. He details the horrors of growing up on a plantation, being subjected to extreme racism, and running away to freedom. He later became an influential writer and activist. Douglass describes how he was separated from hisRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1131 Words   |  5 PagesAshley Moreshead American History 2010 November 8, 2015 Frederick Douglass Essay The â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† is a memoir that depicts the hardships and brutalities, Fredrick himself and other slaves suffered during the time of slavery in the 1800’s. Throughout Douglass’ narrative, he describes the common casualties of growing up, and the limited information he is provided with. This is a direct connection between the ignorance of slaves and the lack of educationRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass : An American Slave1386 Words   |  6 Pagesthe slavery became like a tumor to parasitize the human society rapidly. With physical and psychological abuse, this â€Å"tumor† tortured every struggling people from day to night. As the insight of a dark history, Frederick Douglass’s â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave† demonstrates the dehumanization of an inhuman society and how slavery could make a man be a salve and make another man be an enslaver and how he resisted this dehumanization. In eighteen and nineteen centuriesRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1552 Words   |  7 Pages04/23/2015 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself Theme: False versus True Christianity In this theme, Fredrick Douglass contrasts the both forms of Christianity to show the underlying hypocrisy in slavery. The results show that slavery is not religious as it exposes the evils in human bondage. These ideals however can be distorted so as to fit in the society. Two forms of Christianity are presented in â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass and eachRead More The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1267 Words   |  6 PagesThe Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave was written by Frederick Douglass himself. He was born into slavery in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1817. He has, †¦no accurate knowledge of my age, never having seen any authentic record containing it (47). He became known as an eloquent speaker for the cause of the abolitionists. Having himself been kept as a slave until he escaped from Maryland in 1838Read More Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave2076 Words   |  9 PagesNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: A Masterpiece of Propaganda When was the last time you were exposed to propaganda? If you think it was more than a day ago, you are probably unaware of what propaganda really is. According to Donna Woolfolk Cross in â€Å"Propaganda: How not to be Bamboozled,† propaganda is â€Å"simply a means of persuasion† (149). She further notes that we are subjected daily to propaganda in one form or another as advertisers, politicians, and evenRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1375 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† The book â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† was written by Frederick Douglass. It is based on a true story where Douglass writes down about his life as a slave where he was born in Tuckahoe near Hillsborough. However, his mother was an African American while his father was white. The problem was that all the slaves did not know their birthday therefore, Douglas did not know his own age. Although, his masterRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Essay707 Words   |  3 PagesProfessor C. Hague American Literature Final Exam August 1, 2016 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself Frederick Douglass’s â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself,† qualifies as a slave narrative in countless ways. â€Å" Slave narratives had been ghostwritten or composed with the help of white editors, but the narrative’s vivid detail and stylistic distinctiveness, combined with the reputation Douglass had earned as The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An... Loss of Identity As a means of establishing control early on, slave owners would begin to strip the slaves of any identity they had. In the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself. Douglass writes how he, as well as many other salves do not even know their own birthdate. â€Å"I have no accurate knowledge of my age†, (pg 946). Douglass further reiterates that this is not an uncommon practice by stating, â€Å"By far the larger part of the slaves know as little of their ages as a horse knows of theirs† (pg 946). Another example of striping away a slave’s identity can be found in The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavas Vassa, the African, Written by Himself. Equiano describes the instance in which his master, Michael Henry Pascal, assigns him a new name. â€Å"While I was on board this ship, my captain and master named me Gustavas Vassa† (pg 367). Equiano tries to hold onto the little he has left, and initially refuses to answer to his new name, however, was beaten into submission as noted in the following quote, â€Å"and when I refused to answer my new name, which I at first did, it gained me many a cuff; so at length I submitted, and by which I have been known ever since† (pg 367 bottom) Equiano’s narrative is heavily focused on the destructiveness of slavery. He and his fellow Africans are free people who are kidnapped from their country and sold into slavery in America. In a most outspoken passage, Equiano touchesShow MoreRelatedNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1251 Words   |  6 PagesJustine Boonstra Frey- Period 1 MAJOR WORKS REVIEW AP Lang Version GENERAL 1. Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. 1845. New York: Fine, 2003. Print. 2. Autobiography STRUCTURE 1. Point of View: First Person, the narrator Frederick Douglass 2. Relationship of POV to meaning: 3. Plot Structure a. Exposition: Douglass describes that his mother was a black slave, and his father was a white man. Thus, he was born into slavery and was sent off toRead MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1093 Words   |  5 Pagespossible difference.† -Frederick Douglass. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass, shares the story of the struggles of an American slave during the eighteenth-century. Fredrick Douglass was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1818. While being raised by his grandmother, Betsey Bailey, he snuck around at night to meet his mother nearby, assuming that his slaveholder, Captain Anthony, was his father. From adolescence, Douglass knew he was differentRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1131 Words   |  5 PagesAshley Moreshead American History 2010 November 8, 2015 Frederick Douglass Essay The â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† is a memoir that depicts the hardships and brutalities, Fredrick himself and other slaves suffered during the time of slavery in the 1800’s. Throughout Douglass’ narrative, he describes the common casualties of growing up, and the limited information he is provided with. This is a direct connection between the ignorance of slaves and the lack of educationRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1552 Words   |  7 Pages04/23/2015 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself Theme: False versus True Christianity In this theme, Fredrick Douglass contrasts the both forms of Christianity to show the underlying hypocrisy in slavery. The results show that slavery is not religious as it exposes the evils in human bondage. These ideals however can be distorted so as to fit in the society. Two forms of Christianity are presented in â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass and eachRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass : An American Slave1386 Words   |  6 Pagesthe slavery became like a tumor to parasitize the human society rapidly. With physical and psychological abuse, this â€Å"tumor† tortured every struggling people from day to night. As the insight of a dark history, Frederick Douglass’s â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave† demonstrates the dehumanization of an inhuman society and how slavery could make a man be a salve and make another man be an enslaver and how he resisted this dehumanization. In eighteen and nineteen centuriesRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Essay2361 Words   |  10 PagesReference Teacher Resources ââ€" » More ââ€" » Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Summary Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave cover image summary In Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Douglass recounts his experiences as a slave. He details the horrors of growing up on a plantation, being subjected to extreme racism, and running away to freedom. He later became an influential writer and activist. Douglass describes how he was separated from hisRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave977 Words   |  4 PagesIn 1845 Frederick Douglass published his first book Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. This book not only showed people what life was truly like in the eyes of a slave, but it became instrumental in propelling the abolitionist movement and helping it gain motion all across the country. Douglass was truly a revolutionary person because throughout the duration of slavery, African American people were not permitted to be educated. This was considered dangerous. It wasn’tRead More The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1267 Words   |  6 PagesThe Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave was written by Frederick Douglass himself. He was born into slavery in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1817. He has, †¦no accurate knowledge of my age, never having seen any authentic record containing it (47). He became known as an eloquent speaker for the cause of the abolitionists. Having himself been kept as a slave until he escaped from Maryland in 1838Read MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1375 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† The book â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† was written by Frederick Douglass. It is based on a true story where Douglass writes down about his life as a slave where he was born in Tuckahoe near Hillsborough. However, his mother was an African American while his father was white. The problem was that all the slaves did not know their birthday therefore, Douglas did not know his own age. Although, his masterRead MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1129 Words   |  5 Pagesboth â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave,† by Frederick Douglass and â€Å"Self Reliance†, by Ralph Waldo Emerson, a person may notice a trend that both authors focused on. The trend was the key to happiness or self-fulfillment. Both Ralph Waldo Emerson and Frederick Douglass believed that acquiring knowledge is what people should aim for throughout their lives. They both had different vie wpoints when it came to the type of knowledge individuals should gain. Douglass believed The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An... After the completion of both â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave,† by Frederick Douglass and â€Å"Self Reliance†, by Ralph Waldo Emerson, a person may notice a trend that both authors focused on. The trend was the key to happiness or self-fulfillment. Both Ralph Waldo Emerson and Frederick Douglass believed that acquiring knowledge is what people should aim for throughout their lives. They both had different viewpoints when it came to the type of knowledge individuals should gain. Douglass believed that one should seek to develop their mind while Emerson encouraged people to develop their soul. Frederick Douglass’ novel was a self-titled book depicting the trials and tribulations he had to prevail over as an American slave. Frederick’s views his time as a slave as being paramount in determining the path he decided to take in his future. Throughout time he portrayed a higher level of thinking than most people that were in the predicament as Frederick Douglass. He eventually had less hatred for his masters as he believed they gave him a chance to discover himself as a person. Ralph Waldo Emerson’s novel was more of a second person’s view of others during the post slavery era of America. This is indicated by Frederick Douglass’ book and the use of first person. It is similar to the tone and use of the same person in self-reliance where Ralph Waldo Emerson spoke of the quest he encountered towards identifying his identity and inner self. The settingShow MoreRelatedNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1251 Words   |  6 PagesJustine Boonstra Frey- Period 1 MAJOR WORKS REVIEW AP Lang Version GENERAL 1. Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. 1845. New York: Fine, 2003. Print. 2. Autobiography STRUCTURE 1. Point of View: First Person, the narrator Frederick Douglass 2. Relationship of POV to meaning: 3. Plot Structure a. Exposition: Douglass describes that his mother was a black slave, and his father was a white man. Thus, he was born into slavery and was sent off toRead MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1093 Words   |  5 Pagespossible difference.† -Frederick Douglass. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass, shares the story of the struggles of an American slave during the eighteenth-century. Fredrick Douglass was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1818. While being raised by his grandmother, Betsey Bailey, he snuck around at night to meet his mother nearby, assuming that his slaveholder, Captain Anthony, was his father. From adolescence, Douglass knew he was differentRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1131 Words   |  5 PagesAshley Moreshead American History 2010 November 8, 2015 Frederick Douglass Essay The â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† is a memoir that depicts the hardships and brutalities, Fredrick himself and other slaves suffered during the time of slavery in the 1800’s. Throughout Douglass’ narrative, he describes the common casualties of growing up, and the limited information he is provided with. This is a direct connection between the ignorance of slaves and the lack of educationRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1552 Words   |  7 Pages04/23/2015 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself Theme: False versus True Christianity In this theme, Fredrick Douglass contrasts the both forms of Christianity to show the underlying hypocrisy in slavery. The results show that slavery is not religious as it exposes the evils in human bondage. These ideals however can be distorted so as to fit in the society. Two forms of Christianity are presented in â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass and eachRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Essay2361 Words   |  10 PagesReference Teacher Resources ââ€" » More ââ€" » Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Summary Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave cover image summary In Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Douglass recounts his experiences as a slave. He details the horrors of growing up on a plantation, being subjected to extreme racism, and running away to freedom. He later became an influential writer and activist. Douglass describes how he was separated from hisRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass : An American Slave1386 Words   |  6 Pagesthe slavery became like a tumor to parasitize the human society rapidly. With physical and psychological abuse, this â€Å"tumor† tortured every struggling people from day to night. As the insight of a dark history, Frederick Douglass’s â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave† demonstrates the dehumanization of an inhuman society and how slavery could make a man be a salve and make another man be an enslaver and how he resisted this dehumanization. In eighteen and nineteen centuriesRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave977 Words   |  4 PagesIn 1845 Frederick Douglass published his first book Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. This book not only showed people what life was truly like in the eyes of a slave, but it became instrumental in propelling the abolitionist movement and helping it gain motion all across the country. Douglass was truly a revolutionary person because throughout the duration of slavery, African American people were not permitted to be educated. This was considered dangerous. It wasn’tRead More The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1267 Words   |  6 PagesThe Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave was written by Frederick Douglass himself. He was born into slavery in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1817. He has, †¦no accurate knowledge of my age, never having seen any authentic record containing it (47). He became known as an eloquent speaker for the cause of the abolitionists. Having himself been kept as a slave until he escaped from Maryland in 1838Read MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1375 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† The book â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† was written by Frederick Douglass. It is based on a true story where Douglass writes down about his life as a slave where he was born in Tuckahoe near Hillsborough. However, his mother was an African American while his father was white. The problem was that all the slaves did not know their birthday therefore, Douglas did not know his own age. Although, his masterRead MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Essay1309 Words   |  6 PagesAfter reading Douglass’s The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself, I have a better understanding of what it meant to be a black slave in the antebellum era, and have a better understanding of what form of oppression that they had to face. The fact that black people were oppressed into slavery created their own cultural identity. During this era, Douglass was able to pull himself ou t of terrible circumstances and taught himself how to read and write. As The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An... Beloved Humans Merriam-Webster defines humans as of, relating to, or affecting people. In the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, written by himself, we have learned through his experiences that he disputes the ideas of slavery. Douglass provides evidence on how he and thousands of other black slaves were dehumanized by their slave holders. He was whipped, starved, and uneducated. Since you can be less human; can you be more human? If so, is the oppressor or the oppressed responsible for being less human? Throughout Douglass’s book he explains how he was dehumanized but if he was treated more humane, could he have been more human? Is it even possible to more human? Douglas was able to over come adversity by receiving an education, treating others how he wanted to be treated, and empathizing with people different than himself. â€Å"I succeed in learning how to read and write† (47). Douglass had to learn how to read and write on his own because slave holders believed that if slaves learned how to read they would run away and take over white people’s jobs. Education is a crucial factor in how you are capable of being more human. Literacy helps build the economy and start economic change in our rapidly evolving technological world. Frederick â€Å"devoted his Sundays to teaching these my loved fellow-slaves how to read† (84). Everybody knows a little more about a topic and is responsible for sharing it with others. How did technology advance if you do notShow MoreRelatedNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1251 Words   |  6 PagesJustine Boonstra Frey- Period 1 MAJOR WORKS REVIEW AP Lang Version GENERAL 1. Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. 1845. New York: Fine, 2003. Print. 2. Autobiography STRUCTURE 1. Point of View: First Person, the narrator Frederick Douglass 2. Relationship of POV to meaning: 3. Plot Structure a. Exposition: Douglass describes that his mother was a black slave, and his father was a white man. Thus, he was born into slavery and was sent off toRead MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1093 Words   |  5 Pagespossible difference.† -Frederick Douglass. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass, shares the story of the struggles of an American slave during the eighteenth-century. Fredrick Douglass was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1818. While being raised by his grandmother, Betsey Bailey, he snuck around at night to meet his mother nearby, assuming that his slaveholder, Captain Anthony, was his father. From adolescence, Douglass knew he was differentRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1131 Words   |  5 PagesAshley Moreshead American History 2010 November 8, 2015 Frederick Douglass Essay The â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† is a memoir that depicts the hardships and brutalities, Fredrick himself and other slaves suffered during the time of slavery in the 1800’s. Throughout Douglass’ narrative, he describes the common casualties of growing up, and the limited information he is provided with. This is a direct connection between the ignorance of slaves and the lack of educationRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1552 Words   |  7 Pages04/23/2015 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself Theme: False versus True Christianity In this theme, Fredrick Douglass contrasts the both forms of Christianity to show the underlying hypocrisy in slavery. The results show that slavery is not religious as it exposes the evils in human bondage. These ideals however can be distorted so as to fit in the society. Two forms of Christianity are presented in â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass and eachRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Essay2361 Words   |  10 PagesReference Teacher Resources ââ€" » More ââ€" » Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Summary Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave cover image summary In Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Douglass recounts his experiences as a slave. He details the horrors of growing up on a plantation, being subjected to extreme racism, and running away to freedom. He later became an influential writer and activist. Douglass describes how he was separated from hisRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass : An American Slave1386 Words   |  6 Pagesthe slavery became like a tumor to parasitize the human society rapidly. With physical and psychological abuse, this â€Å"tumor† tortured every struggling people from day to night. As the insight of a dark history, Frederick Douglass’s â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave† demonstrates the dehumanization of an inhuman society and how slavery could make a man be a salve and make another man be an enslaver and how he resisted this dehumanization. In eighteen and nineteen centuriesRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave977 Words   |  4 PagesIn 1845 Frederick Douglass published his first book Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. This book not only showed people what life was truly like in the eyes of a slave, but it became instrumental in propelling the abolitionist movement and helping it gain motion all across the country. Douglass was truly a revolutionary person because throughout the duration of slavery, African American people were not permitted to be educated. This was considered dangerous. It wasn’tRead More The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1267 Words   |  6 PagesThe Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave was written by Frederick Douglass himself. He was born into slavery in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1817. He has, †¦no accurate knowledge of my age, never having seen any authentic record containing it (47). He became known as an eloquent speaker for the cause of the abolitionists. Having himself been kept as a slave until he escaped from Maryland in 1838Read MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1129 Words   |  5 Pagesboth â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave,† by Frederick Douglass and â€Å"Self Reliance†, by Ralph Waldo Emerson, a person may notice a trend that both authors focused on. The trend was the key to happiness or self-fulfillment. Both Ralph Waldo Emerson and Frederick Douglass believed that acquiring knowledge is what people should aim for throughout their lives. They both had different viewpoints when it c ame to the type of knowledge individuals should gain. Douglass believedRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1375 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† The book â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† was written by Frederick Douglass. It is based on a true story where Douglass writes down about his life as a slave where he was born in Tuckahoe near Hillsborough. However, his mother was an African American while his father was white. The problem was that all the slaves did not know their birthday therefore, Douglas did not know his own age. Although, his master The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An... â€Å"Between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference.† -Frederick Douglass. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, by Frederick Douglass, shares the story of the struggles of an American slave during the eighteenth-century. Fredrick Douglass was born in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1818. While being raised by his grandmother, Betsey Bailey, he snuck around at night to meet his mother nearby, assuming that his slaveholder, Captain Anthony, was his father. From adolescence, Douglass knew he was different than the white children running around. He found that the child of a slaveholder and slave was treated more harshly due the convertiverse among the slaveholder and his wife. He also learned that it was acceptable for a slaveholder to beat and strike their slaves. He recognized after many years of a being weakened by his hypocritical slaveholders, it was time to use his abiliti es to rise above the beatings and escape, traveling to the North to gain his freedom. Douglass uses his autobiography to express the distinct separate among the true Christian and white slaveholder Christian during the eighteenth-century American slavery. Douglass seems to weave religious controversy in his autobiography defining the differences of actions among the slaves and slaveholders. Douglass was an American slave that believed in Christianity, but struggled with the idea that slaveholder couldShow MoreRelatedNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1251 Words   |  6 PagesJustine Boonstra Frey- Period 1 MAJOR WORKS REVIEW AP Lang Version GENERAL 1. Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. 1845. New York: Fine, 2003. Print. 2. Autobiography STRUCTURE 1. Point of View: First Person, the narrator Frederick Douglass 2. Relationship of POV to meaning: 3. Plot Structure a. Exposition: Douglass describes that his mother was a black slave, and his father was a white man. Thus, he was born into slavery and was sent off toRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1131 Words   |  5 PagesAshley Moreshead American History 2010 November 8, 2015 Frederick Douglass Essay The â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† is a memoir that depicts the hardships and brutalities, Fredrick himself and other slaves suffered during the time of slavery in the 1800’s. Throughout Douglass’ narrative, he describes the common casualties of growing up, and the limited information he is provided with. This is a direct connection between the ignorance of slaves and the lack of educationRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1552 Words   |  7 Pages04/23/2015 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself Theme: False versus True Christianity In this theme, Fredrick Douglass contrasts the both forms of Christianity to show the underlying hypocrisy in slavery. The results show that slavery is not religious as it exposes the evils in human bondage. These ideals however can be distorted so as to fit in the society. Two forms of Christianity are presented in â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass and eachRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Essay2361 Words   |  10 PagesReference Teacher Resources ââ€" » More ââ€" » Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Summary Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave cover image summary In Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Douglass recounts his experiences as a slave. He details the horrors of growing up on a plantation, being subjected to extreme racism, and running away to freedom. He later became an influential writer and activist. Douglass describes how he was separated from hisRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass : An American Slave1386 Words   |  6 Pagesthe slavery became like a tumor to parasitize the human society rapidly. With physical and psychological abuse, this â€Å"tumor† tortured every struggling people from day to night. As the insight of a dark history, Frederick Douglass’s â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave† demonstrates the dehumanization of an inhuman society and how slavery could make a man be a salve and make another man be an enslaver and how he resisted this dehumanization. In eighteen and nineteen centuriesRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave977 Words   |  4 PagesIn 1845 Frederick Douglass published his first book Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. This book not only showed people what life was truly like in the eyes of a slave, but it became instrumental in propelling the abolitionist movement and helping it gain motion all across the country. Douglass was truly a revolutionary person because throughout the duration of slavery, African American people were not permitted to be educated. This was considered dangerous. It wasn’tRead More The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1267 Words   |  6 PagesThe Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave was written by Frederick Douglass himself. He was born into slavery in Tuckahoe, Maryland in approximately 1817. He has, †¦no accurate knowledge of my age, never having seen any authentic record containing it (47). He became known as an eloquent speaker for the cause of the abolitionists. Having himself been kept as a slave until he escaped from Maryland in 1838Read MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1129 Words   |  5 Pagesboth â€Å"The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave,† by Frederick Douglass and â€Å"Self Reliance†, by Ralph Waldo Emerson, a person may notice a trend that both authors focused on. The trend was the key to happiness or self-fulfillment. Both Ralph Waldo Emerson and Frederick Douglass believed that acquiring knowledge is what people should aim for throughout their lives. They both had different viewpoints when it c ame to the type of knowledge individuals should gain. Douglass believedRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave1375 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† The book â€Å"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave† was written by Frederick Douglass. It is based on a true story where Douglass writes down about his life as a slave where he was born in Tuckahoe near Hillsborough. However, his mother was an African American while his father was white. The problem was that all the slaves did not know their birthday therefore, Douglas did not know his own age. Although, his masterRead MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Essay1309 Words   |  6 PagesAfter reading Douglass’s The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself, I have a better understanding of what it meant to be a black slave in the antebellum era, and have a better understanding of what form of oppression that they had to face. The fact that black people were oppressed into slavery created their own cultural identity. During this era, Douglass was able to pull himself ou t of terrible circumstances and taught himself how to read and write. As

Willa Cather free essay sample

Willa Cather is well known author, mostly recognized for her novels based on the pioneer life of Great Plains. Cather’s first novel, Alexander’s Bridge, was published in 1912. Cather was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1922, for her novel, One of Ours. Willa Cather was born in Virginia in 1873, the oldest of seven children. Cather moved with her family to Red Cloud, Nebraska at age eight. This new home would provide the setting for most of Cather’s novels. Cather later moved to Lincoln, Nebraska to attend the University of Nebraska, although at the time Cather was considering studying medicine. It was not until a paper from a writing class was published that Cather began to consider writing as a career. Cather had great success in her early years after college. For five years, from 1901 to 1906, Cather worked as an English teacher. Cather eventually moved to New York to work for McClure’s magazine. We will write a custom essay sample on Willa Cather or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Cather rose throughout the magazine and eventually became the managing editor. After five years Cather left McClure’s magazine to focus more on her own writing. After Cather’s departure from McClure’s Cather published several books, all focusing on the pioneer lifestyle. Cather even won a Pulitzer Prize. After Cather’s success, she had a period of mild depression. Although it has been mentioned that Cather’s depression may have produced some of her greatest works, which were written during this period. Willa Cather was greatly influenced in her writing by Flaubert, Tolstoy, Dickens, and Emerson. Cather looked to Tolstoy as an exceptional example of fictional writing. While Cather greatly admired male authors, it is said that Cather regarded other female authors as overly emotional and sentimental. Willa Cather was a successful author, who wrote about the struggles of pioneer lifestyle throughout the mid to late 1800’s. Cather published many novels that are still well known today. Cather was awarded one of the most prestigious awards in writing, the Pulitzer Prize. Cather combated a period of depression and produced what some consider to be her best works. Cather was influenced by many great authors such as, Tolstoy Emerson, and Dickens. Many of Cather’s works are still popular today.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Invention of the Light Bulb by Thomas Edison an Example of the Topic Science and Technology Essays by

Invention of the Light Bulb by Thomas Edison Outline: Need essay sample on "Invention of the Light Bulb by Thomas Edison" topic? We will write a custom essay sample specifically for you Proceed Known to researchers, it was not Edison who originally thought of inventing the incandescent lamp it was only him who furnished it with his brilliant ideas and concepts. He come up with it for 5 decades and finally decided to do what he thought, he revise and continued what other inventors did in the making of Electric light among these inventors was Swan. He wanted to find a perfect practical electrical home light. So what he did was continue to study on this until he was able to perfect it with the help of his other assistant. It was through the help of his assistants that they experimented with different things like carbonized cotton thread, platinum and species of vegetable fiber. EssayLab specialists recommend: A Short History Of Tractors In Ukrainian A View Of The Value Of Certain Characters A Wine Connoisseurs Passion Academic Free License And Mozilla Public License 11 They were so diligent and intelligent. They never surrendered in the experiment until they finally found a perfect material for the perfect electric light bulb. Edison wanted to find a material that would not easily be burn out and consumed while it produces the light so practically and less expensive that will be able to compete with the use of gas as lighting. There was such a great planning for this experimentation, it took Edison years to finally decided and laid up the perfect plan for the invention. Edison and his assistants encountered problems along the way as they conducted the experiment. Edison envisioned that a successful light would have to be incandescent so that it would not be burn along the process. He had technical problems as he started his invention. He experimented on different materials until he finally discovered a perfect tool for his perfect incandescent lamp. This took place in his laboratory in the Menlo Park on October 1879. It was on this date that Edisons incandescent lamp was finally perfected. The invention of Edison opened great opportunities to America and Edison himself. Many industries were built after his invention. Definitely, Edison caused the America to be technically progressive for his invention opened the doors for commercialism and built industries that practically helped the economy of America in one way or another. He also served as a model for the other hopefuls there to be like him. He serves as an inspiration for them, that poverty would not be a hindrance for one to succeed and achieve his dreams in life. Invention of the Light Bulb by Thomas Edison Thomas Alva Edison, a United States inventor. He is the most famous of all Americans to make a career of inventing; Edison was called the Wizard of Menlo Park, which was his laboratory for sometime, found in New Jersey. He was especially important for his electrical inventions. Like many inventors of his era, Edison struggled to perfect a system of practical electrical home lighting. He experimented with arc lighting in 1875, but became convinced that successful home lighting would have to be incandescent; that is, use a material that would glow when an electric current passed through it, but not burn in the process. He studied earlier experiments and in 1878 announced that he had the technical problems solved and would create a practical incandescent lamp within six months. The greatest problem was not creating a light for others had done that before but finding a filament that would not quickly burn out, and producing the lamp cheaply enough to compete with gas lighting. Edison began by experimenting with carbon as a filament, but rejected it and tried using platinum. He discovered that a platinum filament would have to be very thin to provide the resistance necessary for use in the high- voltage electrical system he envisioned. However, when made thin enough, the filaments were too fragile and broke. After numerous experiments with platinum, Edison returned to carbon filaments. In October, 1879, Edison and his assistants began to experiment with a filament made of carbonized cotton thread. Enclosed in a glass bulb with a near- perfect vacuum, it shed a bright light and burned for many hours. The practical incandescent lamp had become a reality. Edison and his assistants continued to search for a better filament material. They tried carbonized paper, and tested some species of vegetable fibers. They have experimented bamboo, then Tungsten and the Nitrogen for vacuum, but essentially Edisons lamp was the same as those used today. The incandescent lamp or the electric light bulb brought new opportunities for Edison and to his country, America. Several new industries, including the electric light and power industry, were built based on his invention. He was awarded 1, 093 United States patents. One of his greatest contributions was the development of the privately financed research organization employing expert scientists and technicians. This system, carried on by private industry, has been responsible for much of Americas technical progress since 1900. Edison excelled in the ability to bring together seemingly unrelated scientific principles, grasp their meaning, and put them into practical use. When he was only 31 his reputation as a practical inventor was so well established that a group of investors provided him with $300,000 for a project that many scientists said was impossible and that was the development of incandescent light. He developed products for which he perceived an immediate commercial application which eventually has greatly helped the economy of America. In 1915, Edison became president of the United States Naval Consulting Board, which is formed to develop inventions to improve the defensive power of the Navy. Edisons invention of the electric bulb has brought great opportunities for America, through it their industry was opened and became much promising than ever. During World War I, Edison also took part in helping America, when he created listening devices to detect submarines, underwater search light, water penetrating projectile, a device for detecting enemy airplanes and a telephone system for ships. Many honors came to Edison which also brought fame to America. The French government made him a chevalier of the Legion of Honor and eventually a commander of that order. Indeed, the discovery of the incandescent lamp by Thomas Alva Edison was really important for through it many doors of opportunity were opened for his country, America. In one way it has helped made the country unite and be proud of one of the citizen of their country who aimed high and achieved a lot in his field. It served as an encouragement among the rest of the Americans that poverty and physical incapability can not hinder one from achieving his dreams. Just like Edison who experience poverty once in his life, who was a railroad worker, sold candies, fruits and newspaper and then became partially deaf after his work in the rail road. Edison was optimistic and continued his dreams through his inventions that made him renowned all over the world by being a great and intelligent inventor. References: Conot, R. E. Thomas A. Edison: s Streak of Luck (1979; DaCapo Press reprint, 1986). Greene, Carol. Thomas Alva Edison: Bringer of Light (Childrens Press, 1985). Lampton, C. F. Thomas Alva Edison (Watts, 1988).

Monday, March 16, 2020

What Is SAT Verbal How to Raise Your Reading Score

What Is SAT Verbal How to Raise Your Reading Score SAT / ACT Prep Online Guides and Tips If you've found this article, you might have heard the term SAT Verbal. It's an older, outdated term to describe the SAT Reading and Writing section. However, the content of the SAT Verbal section is still very important today. The many of the topics and skillsfrom what used to be known as SAT Verbal are now tested in the SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section.To do well on the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section, you need to understand what SAT Verbal is, what types of skills it tests, and how to practice it. What Is SAT Verbal? SAT Verbal was the traditional term for the SAT Reading section. Before 2005, the SAT had only two sections: Verbal and Math.The sections were each scored on a scale of 200-800, and your composite SAT score ranged from 400-1600. Then, from 2005-2015, the SAT had three sections: Critical Reading, Math, and Writing. The Critical Reading Section wasnearly the same as the pre-2005 SAT Verbal section, butanalogy questions were eliminated. Since2016, the College Board hasreverted to the old two-section system with scaled composite scores ranging from 400-1600.However, the two sections aren'tMath and Verbal, butMath and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing. Evidence-Based Reading and Writing combines elements of the 2005-2015 Verbal/Critical Reading section with elements of the Writing section.If you’re familiar with the 2005-2015 SAT, you know that the SAT Critical Reading/Verbal section asked two types of questions: sentence-completion and passage-based reading questions. On the new SAT, the SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section will no longer have sentence-completion questions, but will still have passage-based reading questions. What Verbal SAT Skills Are Tested on the New SAT? As I said before, the only part of the SAT verbal remaining in the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section is passage-based reading questions. The new SAT’s passage-based reading questions ask you questions related to five passages: 1 with a US and World Literature topic 2 with a History and Social Studies topic 2 with a Science topic After reading each passage, you’ll be asked questions. The types of questions that you’ll be asked fall into eight categories (each utilizing a slightly different skill). The first six skills were required for the Critical Reading section on the old SAT. Skills 7 and 8 are new. #1: Identify the Meaning of Vocabulary in Context These questions ask you about to identify what a word means in the context of the passage. Sometimes, the word you’re asked about is common (not a very rare world like the old sentence completion words), though these common words are typically being used in an uncommon way in the passage. For example, the word may have multiple meanings and the less common meaning is being tested. Sample Question In line 88, "adhere" most nearly means to stick to a surface to believe in to preach to run away #2: Recognize the Big Picture / Main Point of the Passage These questions will ask you about the overall purpose of the passage. Is the passage meant to inform, review, contradict, prove, parody, hypothesize? Sample Question The primary purpose of the passage is to inform the public about a discovery review a work of art parody a well-known poem contradict a common claim Can you sift through the clutter? #3: Recognizethe Purpose of Small Details in the Passage These questions usually refer to a specific line and ask you about a detail from that line. They may also ask what a phrase or paragraph is accomplishing in the context of the whole passage. Sample Question Which best describes the function of the statement in lines 47-48 ("To...final")? It summarizes the points made in the preceding paragraph. It provides support for the argument made in the first paragraph. It shows a surprising realization. It contrasts recent scientific findings. #4: Infer the Meaning of a Line, Paragraph, or Entire Passage These questions ask you to interpret the meaning of a line, a paragraph, or the whole passage. That may sound difficult, but don’t worry. These won't be asking for your subjective interpretation. There will always be only one correct answer to these questions. Sample Question The author of this passage would likely agree with which of the following statements about the "Dali" referred to in line 2? He should be more criticized. He was ahead of his time. He should be more widely known. He revolutionized modern art. Want to learn more about the SAT but tired of reading blog articles? Then you'll love our free, SAT prep livestreams. Designed and led by PrepScholar SAT experts, these live video events are a great resource for students and parents looking to learn more about the SAT and SAT prep. Click on the button below to register for one of our livestreams today! #5: State the Function of a Phrase or Sentence in the Passage These questions ask you to identify what effect a phrase or sentence has in the passage. Sample Question In lines 7, the author refers to his â€Å"scared smile† primarily to imply that Gerald had no feelings towards Ophelia. suggest that Gerald is excessively concerned about appearances. illustrate some of the exaggerated claims made Gerald’s uncle. emphasize the Gerald’s cowardice. #6: Recognize the Author’sTone,Style, Voice, Attitude, or Perspective In these questions (known as Author Technique questions), you are asked to identify the author's tone, style, voice, attitude, or perspective. Sample Question The author discusses Peruvian culture from the perspective of a concerned spectator an awed traveler an established researcher a beloved native #7: Interpret Data / Use Scientific Reasoning Skills (New Skill for 2016 SAT) For these questions, you will be asked to interpret graphs or charts and choose which fact they best support or least support. You don't need to be a science or data expert to answer these questions correctly, but you’ll need to be proficient at reading and interpreting graphs and charts. Look atour ACT science articles for assistance with this skill as ACT science relies on the same skill. #8: Provide Evidence Support *NEW Skill for 2016 SAT These questions come in sets of two. The first asks a question about the passage, and the second question asks you to identify exactly where in the passage you found your evidence to answer the first question. Sample Questions Via College Board's Test Specifications for the Redesigned SAT How to Practice Your first step in your SAT Verbal practice should be to learn the test format and strategies, soyou’re not surprised the day of the test.Learn more about each type of passage-based reading question, the best passage-based reading strategies, and the best way to study SAT vocabulary. After acquiring this knowledge, you need to start taking SAT practice tests, if you haven’t already.Check out the best SAT reading comprehension practice tests and questions.Make sure to do an in-depth review after completing each practice test.Review is the most important step in your study process.You need to identify what mistakes you’re making, so you don’t make them the day of the test. Followingthese steps will put you well on your way to raising your verbal SAT score! What’s Next? If you're taking the SAT, you should learn about the format of thenew SAT,and also, check out some general tips onhow to prepare for the SAT. Before you start studying for the SAT, figure out what’s a good score for your target college. Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points? Check out our best-in-class online SAT prep program. We guarantee your money back if you don't improve your SAT score by 160 points or more. Our program is entirely online, and it customizes what you study to your strengths and weaknesses. If you liked this Reading lesson, you'll love our program.Along with more detailed lessons, you'll get thousands ofpractice problems organized by individual skills so you learn most effectively. We'll also give you a step-by-step program to follow so you'll never be confused about what to study next. Check out our 5-day free trial:

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Anti-discriminatory practice Essay Example for Free (#5)

Anti-discriminatory practice Essay The problems that can be encountered within staff training and development is that Betty may want the training to take place on a Saturday but the carers who have the day off on Saturdays may not want to go because it may be the only day off they have in a week. Betty could then rearrange the day and have staff training during the week but the downside of that is that there will be no carers left to care for the residents and also there will be a funding problem because Betty will then have to try and get other carers in just for that day. Funding The problems that can be encountered with funding is that if quite a few staff members take the same day off like a Wednesday then Betty will have to ring the staff who shouldn’t be in on Wednesday and see if they will come in, but they don’t want to. Betty will then have to ring and ask see if she can have agency staff to come in and work which will then be costing money that they probably haven’t got. Discrimination The problem with discrimination is that people have their own beliefs and values. A carer doesn’t like black people and there are 1 or 2 black people in the care home where she works. This carer takes in their own beliefs and values before their line of work; this means that the carer will be nice to the â€Å"black† residents when another carer is around but when they are on their own with them they call them names and are just discriminating against them because of their own beliefs and values. If the â€Å"black† residents complain about this carer then she will get assessed and if it is still going on she will end up with the sack and also taken to court. Manager There are problems with managers like funding because some carers may want a pay rise and if there isn’t enough money then obviously the carers cant have their pay rise and they may quit their job as a result of this. Another problem for a manager is that the care home could be an old building. Old buildings are more likely to have damp and to start falling down. This could link into the funding because if there wasn’t enough funding then the care home would have to get closed down because they wouldn’t be able to re-damp proof the walls/ceilings and also they wouldn’t be able to afford building works. Cooks There are a few problems for cooks because if they haven’t got enough staff working in the kitchens then everyone would have to be fed at different times which could be a problem with service users if they had a set feeding time. Storage is a problem because if it was a small kitchen then the cook wouldn’t have enough room to store appliances and food. Under trained staff is another problem because if staff wasn’t trained properly then germs could be passed on and also food may not be cooked properly. Cleaners A big problem for cleaners is that they could be denied access to a room by a service user. The reason this is a problem is that the cleaner may not get paid if all rooms are not cleaned properly although it wouldn’t be the cleaners fault. Cleaners can also have problems with respect because some carers think they are better than the cleaners because they don’t have to do the dirty jobs other than changing some residents. Receptionist Problems for receptionists is that if there is a client on the phone and there was a problem then the receptionist would get a mouth full although it wouldn’t be there fault. The reason the receptionist would get an ear full is because they are the first person that the client is going to speak to on the matter and the client will think it’s the receptionists fault because they answered the phone. When actually all the receptionist is there for is to make and/or receive calls and also to book appointments. Communication can be a problem especially if the service user doesn’t speak English. The reason this would be a problem is if the service user didn’t speak English then the receptionist will not understand what they rang up for. Carer Carers get a lot of problems because they could be discriminated against especially if they were male. The reason for this is that there are more female residents in a care home than there are males and some women don’t like to be washed by a bloke even though that is what they were employed for. Anti-discriminatory practice. (2017, Sep 10).